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tshiggins
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« on: January 07, 2015, 09:00:48 PM »

Okay, my condo is now habitable, again, so I'd like to start up the "wainscot magic" campaign I've discussed with some of you.

A friend of mine, Anten, will join us, as will two of my nieces and perhaps my sister. Some of Anten's friends may also join the campaign, but that's not a sure thing.

As it is, I don't know (at this point) whether I'd have one large group or two smaller ones. I'll know by early next week, or so.

Anyway, I have enough players, now, to move ahead with campaign planning. I'd like to schedule a get-together, to discuss characters and get everybody on board with how I hope things go.

Anten and the nieces plan to come over a week from Saturday, the afternoon of Jan. 17. If any of you guys are interested, please let me know. Send me an email for particulars.

If we get enough people who want to play that I need two parties, one will be an SAR team based in Moab, as described. The other will work for Northern Territory Fire and Rescue, in Alice Springs, NT, Australia.

Anyway, here are the basics. I wrote this up for Anten and the nieces, so you guys know some of this stuff, already.

General Information

This campaign will use GURPS 4th Edition, and we’ll hold all the sessions in my condo at the southern edge of Denver’s Capitol Hill neighborhood. I’m far enough south of central Capitol Hill that parking is usually available within a block, or so, but carpooling is highly recommended.

Contact me at my e-mail, tshiggins80701@yahoo.com, for the exact address and a contact number.

I’d like to hold a session every third Saturday, or so, commencing in mid-January. The first session should be a “get-acquainted” meeting, where we can discuss characters, eliminate unnecessary redundancies, and generally get to know one another. The more experienced players may want to have draft characters made, before then; the rest should have solid character concepts in mind, which we can then lock down into stats and skill numbers.

GM Style

Generally speaking, I prefer campaigns with plenty of grit and granularity. For fantasy, think less Lord of the Rings or Princess Bride, and more Labyrinth of the Faun (Pan’s Labyrinth), or Pacte des Loups (Brotherhood of the Wolf) or Game of Thrones. For post-apocalypse, I prefer The Road Warrior or The Walking Dead, but not Waterworld or The Quiet Earth or Priest. For science fiction, I look to Blade Runner, Firefly, the original Alien and Pitch Black much more than Star Trek or Star Wars.

That skew toward realistic grittiness (as well as sheer flexibility) is why I’ve played GURPS for more than 30 years, now, and why we’ll use it for this campaign. “Facets” may eventually become more cinematic, but it’ll start out pretty hard-nosed and realistic.

Generally speaking, I don’t care to bog down the game with GM negotiation or extended rules-lawyering. GURPS locks down the character concepts and capabilities, at the beginning, and after that things work fairly intuitively.

As such, I prefer that characters have well-defined capabilities and personalities, with minimal need for interpretation. When we do run into a rules problem, I’ll make a snap decision to keep the session moving (“When in doubt, roll and shout!”). We can then look up the actual rule between sessions, so we can use it properly, thereafter, without unduly interrupting play.

About the only thing we’ll need to look up, regularly, are the range and speed tables for firearm combat. (And, yes, guns are freakin’ lethal, in GURPS. The best thing to do is take cover and then return fire, so you don’t get shot.)

I also like to use miniatures for tactical combat, because that helps people visualize what’s happening, with minimal need for explanation and little risk of misinterpretation. After a session or two, that works intuitively, as well.

I shouldn’t have to say this, but I expect my players to treat each other respectfully. I have no patience for misogynistic comments or racial epithets, and those who behave in such a fashion will be asked to leave.

As part of that respect, I expect the players to allow one another to make decisions for their characters, as they choose, and maintain the “firewall” between what the players know and what the characters don’t.

Please don’t use “out of game” knowledge held by the player to alter the character’s behavior in an unrealistic fashion. Generally, the PCs should be mostly “good guys,” but that won’t stop them from having their own goals. That may sometimes cause them to work at cross-purposes, and that’s okay. It adds richness and player-generated drama, to the campaign.

(I know this can be a challenge, and I'll try to help by passing notes to various players about things their characters know that other characters do not. I also make myself available to discuss character goals and activities, between sessions. If needed, I’ll take a player aside for a brief discussion -- but we should try to avoid leaving the other players to twiddle their thumbs, for too long.)

Finally, please respect the commitment of the other players to this campaign, by committing to it, yourself. Real-life (and homework) definitely take precedence over gaming, but please don’t treat this as something you do only when you’re not doing anything else.

When we schedule a session, please treat it as your primary social engagement, for that day; we’d all appreciate it.

Campaign Info

The campaign, “Facets,” generally falls into the genre category of “Modern-Day Wainscot Fantasy.” The campaign begins in Moab, Utah (or Alice Springs, Australia) in the spring of 2014, in a world that appears to closely match our reality.

To most people, magic and monsters exist only in movies and fairy-tales (and Sesame Street). The occasional brush with strangeness is largely dismissed by everyone as “silliness,” and everything must have a rational explanation.

For inspiration, I’ll draw from The Dresden Files series of books, as well as the TV show, Supernatural (the “monster of the week” episodes) and the old 1970s series, Kolchak: The Nightstalker. I’ll include a smattering of ideas from Buffy and Angel, as well (but the campaign world has no Slayers).

As a general rule, I avoid Abrahamic religions and myths, as I think the stark “good versus evil” themes entirely too limiting. I find “shades of gray” much more fun.

The campaign will use GURPS Ritual Magic with Decanic correspondences. As such, most magical spells cannot be cast from scratch, in combat. Amulets and talismans prepared ahead of time will prove useful (think of Harry Dresden’s blasting rod, and his shield bracelet), and enchanted items will certainly come in handy.

That said, magical rituals can be very powerful, if a mage has the time to cast them, uninterrupted. Planning will matter a lot.

Character Creation

Players should build characters based on a base of 125 points, with no more than 45 points of disadvantages and five points of quirks.

By comparison, most Americans with a high school education lie between 25 points and 75 points (skilled trades put someone on the high end of that range, fast-food cooks and waitresses on the low). Professionals with college degrees, or former military, lie between 50 points and 100 points, depending on exact skill sets. Degreed professionals with military or similarly-active backgrounds equal about 125 points.

(For a decent gauge of scale, John McClane in the first Die Hard movie was worth about 250 character points. He was a former military special operator who worked as a lieutenant detective with the NYPD. McClane had the skills, experience and sheer toughness to single-handedly take down a team of prepared, well-equipped terrorists – although he was a bloody mess, by the end. He gained points as the movies progressed, and probably qualified as a “minor superhero” of about 350 points, or so, by the last film. On the other hand, Holly Gennero-McClane was smart, brave, well-educated, somewhat affluent, reasonably attractive, thought fast on her feet, and threw a mean punch. She was about 125 points.)

Characters will start the campaign as volunteers with the well-funded “Four-Corners Search and Rescue” (“Four-Cee-SAR: Saving butts since ’78!”), which is loosely based on Utah’s Grand County SAR. (A second group would act as volunteers for the even better funded Northern Territory Emergency Services.)

(For more information about GCSAR, see the organization’s Web site at, http://www.gcsar.org/241/Grand-County-Search-Rescue-GCSAR. The Northern Territory Fire and Rescue has a site at, http://pfes.nt.gov.au/Fire-and-Rescue.aspx.)

Players should build characters as mundanes, with no magical skills, talents or esoteric knowledge. That will be taken care of by the end of the first or second session. A major theme of the campaign will be how people raised in a world of reason and science deal with the knowledge that magic is real, and things really do go bump in the night.

(“Dragons?! Those are a thing?!” “Lots of things are things.” –Jody Mills and Sam Winchester, Supernatural, Episode 8, Season 9.)

An SAR squad consisting of 125-point characters will constitute a team of professionals from various fields, who also have the first-responder, incident-management and outdoor skills that make them some of the best. Characters should have primary professional skills of 12 or 13 – maybe one at 14 -- with secondary skills of 10 or 11.

[Explanation: In GURPS, skills of 14 or 15 make the character one of the best in the country at what he or she does (and he or she could earn a decent living by teaching others), while a 16 would make the character a world-class talent and internationally-recognized in his or her professional field. (And what the hell is that person doing, working in freakin’ rural southern Utah, or northern Australia?)]

At the beginning of a campaign, it’s best to build a character with good stats and a decent variety of skills, plus a nifty advantage or two, rather than specialize with high points in a narrow field. That makes a character generally useful from the get-go, with lots of growth potential.

The first five experience points received by the characters can (and should!) be used to purchase new skills the player forgot, or didn’t realize would be needed. After that, experience points must go to increase skills used in play, or derived stats, or even basic attributes.

New skills may be learned via the standard GURPS  “time to learn” of 400 hours of solo study, or 200 hours with the help of a teacher. Players should schedule that study time for their characters (and plan it, together), figure out how to pay for the training and cover lifestyle expenses for the duration, and work out how it fits into the characters’ regular lives. Fortunately, training and education in most skills is readily available, in the modern world.

(Usually, this will occur organically, as the campaign progresses, and the time will pass “between” sessions. As such, the PCs’ next “adventure” may take place as much as two or three months after the previous one.)

Four-Cee-SAR conducts operations throughout the Four Corners region of Utah, Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona. It has cooperative agreements with county and local law enforcement groups throughout the area; municipal and rural fire protection districts; and rangers in both state parks and federal lands.

The organization has no formal agreements with the Ute, Navaho or Hopi Nations (and receives no funding support from them), but cultivates good relations with tribal police, EMTs, and fire units. Four-Cee-SAR can count on their cooperation in most situations. A few Native Americans who live inside the Rezzes began to volunteer to work with Four-Cee-SAR in the 1990s, and the organization welcomes them.

Most SAR groups (in both the U.S. and Australia) depend on unpaid volunteers, but many do offer members the chance to purchase state-sponsored health insurance and other benefits. This sort of SAR team has members of all sorts of backgrounds, including farmers and small business owners who like to help -- and need the benefits.

Former military types are obvious volunteers. County sheriff deputies might be, as well, although law enforcement tends to work with the SAR volunteers, and not for the volunteer organization. Still, county law enforcement would make a good character concept.

Other volunteers might include veterinarians, or even doctors or nurses who like to do something a bit more adventurous. EMTs and other first-responder types are obvious, as are wildland firefighters or smoke-jumpers who want something to do during the off-season. (Especially if it gives them familiarity with terrain through which they might have to fight a fire, later.)

Outdoorsy types of all sorts (hunting guides, river-rafters, ski-patrollers) could be drawn to SAR work, and Moab is a haven for extreme outdoor sports enthusiasts. A low-end sponsored mountain-bike competitor might join, as could a semi-pro snow-boarder or moto-cross racer.

Computer geeks who like outdoor recreation might volunteer (and struggle to get assigned to do something other than fix the organization’s software…). Semi-retired professionals or skilled high-tech contractors might like the combination of camaraderie and good health insurance.

By comparison, Alice Springs, Australia, is a bit less affluent, but its status as the primary community in the "Red Centre" of Australia makes it a haven for all sorts of eccentrics and peculiar characters. It also has a sizable population of Aborigines.

Characters should be socially well-adjusted enough to work reasonably well as part of a team, and should have no problems with the altruistic behavior of others. Most should be good folks, themselves.

Sociopaths, wanna-be villains, and misanthropic ass-hats would not fit in well with SAR volunteers (and I don’t want them as PCs in the campaign, anyway).

Also, keep in mind that the campaign will begin in modern America or modern Australia – and that means 15-point disadvantages are a big deal and may act as magnets for serious problems.

For instance, a male character with the 15-point disadvantage, “Lecherousness,” will almost certainly have been fired from at least two jobs for sexual harassment, regularly gets in bar-fights with the boyfriends of attractive drinkers, and may suffer from a negative reputation.

A female with the same disadvantage will have been divorced at least once, likely has been fired for sexual harassment, is actively disliked by nearly every woman she meets because she’s often the “other woman” for a married man, and frequently wakes up next to some jerk she barely knows.

Choose disadvantages carefully, because I will enforce them! Pick only those you want to play!

Suggested Advantages and Skills (Plus, DM Peculiarities!)


Most SAR personnel should have the Professional Skill (IQ Avg), “First Responder.” This primarily reflects knowledge of “Incident Management,” an organizational methodology that scales to emergency situations of all sorts. Most SAR, First Responder, Emergency Medical, and Law Enforcement training programs teach this.

Characters should have at least one point in either “Survival (Desert)” or “Survival (Mountain)” (or both); one point in “First Aid,” and points in “Climbing”, “Swimming”, “Hiking”, “Running” and “Tracking”.

A point or two in “Diagnosis” is appropriate for professional medical types, such as EMTs, nurses and doctors, or those with veterinary skills, as would be a point or two in First Aid and Surgery.

The skills, “Meteorology”, “Physical Geography”, “Geology”, “Biology” or “Cartography” could be quite useful, and appropriate for park rangers or academic types who study the desert ecology and terrain. “Archaeology” and “History” would be appropriate for scholars who study the ancient people who lived in the area.

The advantages, “Fit” and “Extremely Fit” are wholly appropriate, and “Fit” is highly recommended.

Most outdoorsy types in the Four Corners region will have at least a point or two in skills with firearms (pistols and rifles, probably), while former military personnel and law-enforcement officers may have more. Firearms are not as prevalent in Australia as they are in the United States, but pistols, rifles and shotguns aren't uncommon. Former Australian Defense Force (ADF) or New Zealand Defense Force (NZDF) military will be fully trained in the use of any sort of military equipment.

I prefer to give players the information needed to figure out things, themselves, and actively dislike “GM-gimme” traits. As such, DO NOT take the Advantage, “Common Sense.”

Also, a successful roll made by the player of former military characters who take “Tactics,” will receive additional information about the enemy’s likely actions, may use it in place of “Perception” for combat situations, and can take advice from other players. However, I will not tell them how best to deploy a squad or combat unit – the players should work that out.

The skill, “Strategy” works the same way, on a larger scale, and provides information about an opponent’s likely goals and general plans. The players have to figure out how to respond.

(Both skills, plus Leadership, will work for mass combat as described in those rules.)

In my campaigns, the derived stat, “Perception,” helps the character notice something is happening, while the skill “Observation,” provides useful context.

For instance, a successful roll against “Perception,” made as a character walks along a path, would allow him or her to see the five mule-deer (or kangaroos) in the tall grass of the meadow, 30 yards away. A successful roll against “Observation” would allow him or her to notice that the herbivores are moving away from the character, while looking nervously at something on the top of the bluff behind the spot where the character stands.

This brings up my preferred dice-rolling convention. Players will make their own rolls when the success or failure is obvious. (Rolls to hit, rolls to dodge, Climbing, Swimming, Fishing, etc.). However, for information rolls (such as the aforementioned “Perception” and “Observation” and “Tactics”) I’ll make the roll and tell the character what he or she learned (which may be wrong, if the roll failed).

Additionally, I may make rolls for things such as “Stealth” or “Shadowing,” the outcome of which depends on the margin of success or failure of the character sneaking or stalking, versus the margin of success or failure of the “Perception” and/or “Observation” of the character snuck up on or stalked.

That’s about it. It’s also a lot to read, so I’ll stop.

Let me know if you have any questions or concerns.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2015, 09:43:45 PM by tshiggins » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2015, 07:30:45 AM »

Okay, G-n-A snapped out a great character, right away. This is the sort of guy who would live in Moab (and would easily translate to an Aussie version in Alice Springs).

The Arm Lock skill is high for a starting character, and he could use some of those points to improve Randy's skills in Naturalist and Navigation so they're not just defaults.

However, that's just a quibble, really. Randy is a character who is basically ready to play, and serves as a good example of GURPS character construction.



Name: "Random" Randy Shoop, Extreme Athlete / FCSAR Volunteer [125]


Image: A white guy in his mid-20s, with average height, boyish good looks, and an athletic build.

Culture: TL: 8 [0]; Familiarity: Western [0]; Languages: English (Native / Native) [0];

Attributes: ST 11 [10]; DX 13 [60]; IQ 11 [20]; HT 11 [10];

Secondaries: BL 24#; Dam 1d-1 / 1d+1; Spd: 6.0 [0]; Mov: 6 [0]; HP: 12 [2]; FP: 11 [0]; Perception: 11 [0]; Willpower: 13 [10];

Advantages:
Appearance (Attractive) [4]
Combat Reflexes [15]
Fit [5]
Reputation +2 (Extreme Sports Fans, 10-) [1]
Signature Gear (Expensive Titanium Mountain Bike) [1];

Perks:
Brave [1]
Dabbler (Eagle Scout: +2 Default for Knot-Tying, Leadership, Naturalist, and Navigation: Land) [1]
Dabbler (Yoga Enthusiast: +2 Default for Acrobatics, Meditation, Religious Ritual: Hindu, and Theology: Hindu) [1]
Equipment Bond (Signature Bike) [1]
Style Familiarity: Krav Maga [1];

Disadvantages:
Overconfidence (12-) [-5]
Pacifism (Can't Harm Innocents) [-10]
Sense of Duty (Helpless People) [-10]
Short Attention Span (12-) [-10]
Wealth (Struggling) [-10];

Quirks
Adrenaline Junkie [-1]
Imaginative [-1]
Mildly Impulsive [-1]
Mildly Lecherous [-1]
Nosy [-1]

Skills:
Acrobatics (H) DX-4d [0]-9
Area Knowledge (E) (Utah) IQ [1]-11
Bicycling (E) DX+2 [4]-15
Climbing (A) DX-1 [1]-12
Driving/TL8 (Automobile) DX-1 [1]-12
First Aid/TL8 IQ+1 [2]-12
Hiking (A) HT-1 [1]-10
Karate (H) DX [4]-13
Knot-Tying (E) DX-2d [0]-11
Leadership (A) IQ-3d [0]-8
Meditation (H) Will-4d [0]-9
Naturalist (H) IQ-4d [0]-7
Navigation (A) (Land) IQ-3 [0]-8
Parachuting/TL8 (E) DX [1]-13
Pro Skill (A) (First-Responder) IQ [2]-11
Running (A) HT-1 [1]-10
Religious Ritual (H) (Hindu) IQ-4d [0]-7
Sport (A) (Snowboarding) DX-1 [1]-12
Survival (A) (Desert) Per-1 [1]-10, (Mountain) Per-1 [1]-10
Swimming (E) HT [1]-11
Theology (H) (Hindu) IQ-4d [0]-7
Tracking (A) Per-1 [1]-10
Wrestling (A) DX+1 [4]-14;

Techniques:
Arm Lock (A) (Wrestling) Def+4 [4]-18
Knee Strike (A) (Karate) Def+1 [1]-13;

Background: Randy isn't actually stupid; he just acts like it most of the time. A jovially-energetic overgrown adolescent in pretty much every way other than his sense of responsibility to others, he lives a Spartan life of adventure off his low-end semi-pro mountain biking sponsorships, always ready for the next challenge but unable to focus on it (or a regular job) for very long if it stops being a wild-ass thrill ride. Other than his flighty, juvenile nature, he is considered a rock of stability by his SAR team; he always has everybody's back, and never cracks under pressure.
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2015, 10:58:51 AM »

Here's a sample character (easily flipped to Australia by swapping out Native American crap for Aboriginal crap) to use for ideas or up for grabs wholesale:

Name: "Indiana" Joan Jenkins, Anthropologist / FCSAR Volunteer [125]:

Image: A bookish-but-outdoorsy woman in her early-30s, with wire-rim glasses and a slender build, usually dressed in rugged hiking gear, a cowboy hat ringed with turquoise and silver conchas, and a .357 Magnum revolver on her hip if she's in the field.

Culture: TL: 8 [0]; Familiarity: SW North American Native [1], Western [0]; Languages: English (Native / Native) [0], Hopi (Broken / Broken) [2], Navajo (Broken / Broken) [2], Spanish (Accented / Accented) [4], Ute (Broken / Broken) [2];

Attributes: ST 9 [-10]; DX 10 [0]; IQ 14 [80]; HT 14 [40];

Secondaries: BL 16#; Dam 1d-2 / 1d-1; Spd: 6.0 [0]; Mov: 6 [0]; HP: 9 [0]; FP: 14 [0]; Perception: 14 [0]; Willpower: 14 [0];

Advantages:
Fit [5];
Reputation +2 ("Colorful but Harmless Weirdo with Minor but Sound Publications in a Narrow Sub-Field," Academia, 10-) [1];

Perks:
Honest Face [1];
Huge Weapons (ST +1 Guns) [1];

Disadvantages:
Bad Sight (Nearsighted; Mitigator: Glasses -60%) [-10];
Curious (6-) [-10];
Pacifism (Reluctant Killer) [-5];
Skinny [-5];
Stubbornness [-5];

Quirks:
Fan of the Adventure / Pulp / Western Genre; Enjoys Playing the Mysterious, Aloof High Plains Drifter Role [-1];
Imaginative [-1];
Mildly Impulsive [-1];
Mild Obsession (Native Spiritual Beliefs) [-1];
Uncongenial [-1];

Skills:
Animal Handling (A) (Equine) IQ-1 [1]-13;
Anthropology (H) IQ-1 [2]-13;
Archaeology (H) IQ-1 [2]-13;
Architecture/TL0 (A) IQ-1 [1]-13;
Area Knowledge (E) (Utah) IQ [1]-14;
Climbing (A) DX [2]-10;
Detect Lies (H) Per-2 [1]-12;
Diplomacy (H) IQ-2 [1]-12;
Driving/TL8 (A) (Automobile) DX-1 [1]-9;
Fast-Draw (E) (Pistol) DX+1 [2]-11;
First Aid/TL8 IQ [1]-14;
Guns/TL8 (E) (Pistol) DX+1 [2]-11;
Hiking (A) HT-1 [1]-13;
Intimidation (A) Will-1 [1]-13;
Naturalist (H) IQ-2 [1]-12;
Navigation (A) (Land) IQ-1 [1]-13;
Observation (A) Per [2]-14;
Occultism (A) IQ-1 [1]-13;
Pro Skill (A) (First-Responder) IQ-1 [1]-13;
Riding (A) (Equine) DX [2]-10;
Running (A) HT-1 [1]-13;
Religious Ritual (H) (SW Native) IQ-2 [1]-12;
Search (A) Per [2]-14;
Survival (A) (Desert) Per-1 [1]-13, (Mountain) Per-1 [1]-13;
Swimming (E) HT [1]-14;
Theology (H) (SW Native) IQ-2 [1]-12;
Tracking (A) Per-1 [1]-13;

Notes: This character is no combat monster despite taking full and slightly ostentatious advantage of Utah's carry laws, but is probably going to be the smartest person in the party, will rarely miss noticing anything, and is highly-resistant to physical and mental hazards such as poison, disease, getting tired, fear, mind-control, etc. Also, she's probably going to be hell on wheels if the party gets their hands on magic at some point.

Background: Joan likes to think of herself as an Adventure Anthropologist, but she hadn't really had a lot of adventures more dramatic than some light rappelling and occasionally firing her gun in the air to scare off some coyotes until she started volunteering with the FCSAR. She is brilliant, perceptive, and fearless, but utterly rash and unwilling to quit in the pursuit of knowledge and novelty. It hasn't happened in a disastrous way yet, but there's a significant possibility that she could get distracted from a SAR mission by a major archaeological find if there's a time-pressured conflict (eg: a mudslide is about to wash away either Grandma or a priceless artifact). It's not that she doesn't wish endangered people well and all, she's just not especially preoccupied with them more than already-dead people the way some of the team is; she's more in this SAR thing for the excitement and challenge than warm and fuzzy feelings.
« Last Edit: January 08, 2015, 11:05:25 AM by Gold & Appel Inc » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2015, 12:02:57 PM »

Sample Character #2:

Name: Molly Chang, News Pilot / FCSAR Volunteer [125]:

Image: A short Asian-American (or Asian-Australian) woman with an athletic build, in her late-20s. She wears whatever's appropriate, but whatever it is, it looks great on her, from a cocktail dress, to grease-stained coveralls, to blood-stained coveralls.

Culture: TL: 8 [0]; Familiarity: Western [0]; Languages: English (Native / Native) [0];

Attributes: ST 10 [0]; DX 11 [20]; IQ 12 [40]; HT 13 [30];

Secondaries: BL 20#; Dam 1d-2 / 1d; Spd: 6.0 [0]; Mov: 6 [0]; HP: 10 [0]; FP: 13 [0]; Perception: 12 [0]; Willpower: 13 [5];

Advantages:
Contact Group (Local Journalism: 15, 12-, Somewhat Reliable) [20];
Fashion Sense [5];
Signature Gear (Mechanical Tool Kit) [1];

Perks:
Attribute Sub (Piloting -> IQ) [1];
Classic Features (Han Chinese) [1];

Disadvantages:
Code of Honor (Journalist) [-5];
Pacifism (Can't Harm Innocents AND Reluctant Killer) [-15];
Slow Riser [-5];
Vow (Protect the Innocent) [-10];

Quirks:
Adrenaline Junkie [-1];
Incompetence: Diplomacy [-1];
Mildly Impulsive [-1];
Mildly Overconfident [-1];
Proud [-1];

Skills:
Area Knowledge (E) (Utah) IQ+1 [2]-13;
Climbing (A) DX-1 [1]-10;
Current Events/TL8 (E) (Headline News) IQ [1]-12;
Detect Lies (H) Per-2 [1]-10;
Driving/TL8 (A) (Automobile) DX-1 [1]-10;
Electronics Operation/TL8 (A) (Media) IQ+1 [4]-13, (Medical) IQ-1 [1]-11;
Electronics Repair/TL8 (A) (Media) IQ-1 [1]-11, (Medical) IQ-1 [1]-11;
Fast Talk (A) IQ-1 [1]-11;
First Aid/TL8 IQ+2 [4]-14;
Hiking (A) HT-1 [1]-12;
Judo (H) DX+1 [8]-12;
Mechanic/TL8 (A) (Helicopter) IQ-1 [1]-11;
Navigation (A) (Air) IQ-1 [1]-11;
Observation (A) Per [2]-12;
Photography/TL8 (A) IQ [2]-12;
Piloting/TL8 (A) (Helicopter) IQ+1 [4]-13;
Pro Skill (A) (First-Responder) IQ-1 [1]-11;
Running (A) HT-1 [1]-12;
Sex Appeal (A) HT-1 [1]-12;
Swimming (E) HT [1]-13;
Tracking (A) Per-1 [1]-11;

Notes: On the practical side, this is a straightforward utility character, well-rounded but especially good at making transportation work, operating it, and healing the party, and also with decent social skills. On the RP side she is probably the biggest bleeding-heart idealist in the party at her core, but is also a slightly-arrogant, slightly-reckless smartass on the surface.  

Background: Molly grew up in Utah and never left (though she is no longer a practicing Mormon). She works as a news pilot to pay the bills when she's not volunteering for the FCSAR, and bears romanticized journalistic ideals despite not directly writing the stories.
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« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2015, 05:26:21 PM »

Hmm.

Molly is an interesting character, and there's no problem with the mechanics of her build, but we need to change her around a little bit -- mostly to make her a little more authentic.

Basically, newspaper reporters don't volunteer to join RFDs or SAR groups, at all, as a matter of professional ethics. Additionally, both Moab and Alice Springs are small towns, and the media companies that exist there couldn't afford either a helicopter or a pilot to fly one.

Moab has two small newspapers, and a local radio station, but the nearest local television broadcaster is up in Provo. One of the Provo stations might be able to afford a news-copter and pilot, but it's much more likely that only those in Salt Lake City could do that. Both cities are pretty far up the road.

As with most strong ethical codes, the one for journalists is pretty solidly based in practical reality. For instance, no matter how popular and competent he may be, and no matter how many lives he may have saved, if it turns out the local chief of the rural fire department, or the head of 4CSAR, played fast and loose with the grant money, the journalist's job is to put his name on the front page, and destroy his career.

That would make for engine crew or SAR team dynamics that would qualify as "awkward," at best. Moreover, cops and firefighters generally would prefer that reporters learn about what went on after the fact, but not during. A significant part of Incident Management training includes, "How to manage the press."

Generally speaking, reporters observe and report the news -- they try to avoid direct participation in newsworthy events.

That said, a lot of emergency services guys like it when journalists take Incident Management training (as I did), because it makes them a lot more likely to understand why they need stay the hell out of the way, for a few minutes.

Because of all that, journalists don't make for good characters, in this particular campaign. In fact, they're a lot more likely to prove problematic than useful, because they tend to poke their noses into things, and warnings only confirm there's something to find.

I think the journalism isn't necessary for Molly, anyway. We can still get a transportation and healing generalist; we just need to approach it differently.

How about a former U.S. Army med-evac pilot, who earned her wings and now works for a general aviation charter company, based in nearby Canyonlands Field? Her piloting skill is probably enough to have earned her Mountain Flying certification, but at Skill 13 she might want more experience before she takes solo trips to the ski areas in Utah, Colorado or Idaho.

As it is, she makes her living taking people from Salt Lake City to the various state and national parks, remote lakes and camping sites, and even as far south as the Grand Canyon.

Some of Molly's passengers would qualify as quite affluent. If they have people to impress, she's pretty enough that some would request her, in particular. That might justify an ally, and it could also mean she picked up a chauffeur's license and may have taken a bodyguard driving course.

Make her employer a strong supporter of the Utah Civil Air Patrol (CAP), which means he or she encourages the employees to assist SAR with aerial searches, when the company has 'copters or puddle-jumpers available for them to use. (That's a nice tax-break for the company, too.)

The rest of the time, Molly volunteers to beat the bushes on foot or by vehicle, with a regular 4CSAR team. She'll have a pretty irregular work schedule for the charter airline, and probably gets paid (pretty well) by the trip. The amount of time she spends in the air will vary a lot, according to the time of year, and the springtime "mud season" might get a little lean.
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« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2015, 05:51:43 AM »

Hmm.

Molly is an interesting character, and there's no problem with the mechanics of her build, but we need to change her around a little bit -- mostly to make her a little more authentic.

Basically, newspaper reporters don't volunteer to join RFDs or SAR groups, at all, as a matter of professional ethics. [snip]

This is what I get for trying to throw the GM a bone by drawing on a subject he knows very well. ;]

But seriously, Noobs, if you know enough about the GM's interests and experiences (eg: he's your Brother / Uncle), you can use that as a tool to provide him or her with reams of intuitively-easy material that pertains directly to your character. This usually leads to more attention and fun for you the player, except when it works a little too well.

Additionally, both Moab and Alice Springs are small towns, and the media companies that exist there couldn't afford either a helicopter or a pilot to fly one.

ITT we learn that G&AINC did no research at all for this. :]

[snip] Because of all that, journalists don't make for good characters, in this particular campaign. In fact, they're a lot more likely to prove problematic than useful, because they tend to poke their noses into things, and warnings only confirm there's something to find.

I think the journalism isn't necessary for Molly, anyway. We can still get a transportation and healing generalist; we just need to approach it differently. [snip]

Right, back to the drawing board then. Noobs: This is another normal part of PC development in GURPS, but once you're done you don't have to do it again unless your PC gets killed or otherwise written out of the game, or unless you start a new game, and you can usually do an end-run around the whole process (in this group, anyway) by picking a finished sample (Christopher nearly-always does this, but then righteously plays the shit out of it; bless him).

How about a former U.S. Army med-evac pilot, who earned her wings and now works for a general aviation charter company, based in nearby Canyonlands Field? Her piloting skill is probably enough to have earned her Mountain Flying certification, but at Skill 13 she might want more experience before she takes solo trips to the ski areas in Utah, Colorado or Idaho. [snip]

I was trying to avoid ex-military with my samples, because a) I figure it'll probably be a popular choice among players experienced with the typical level of violence in games you don't run, and that steering the Noobs towards other niches would give them more to do, and b) it necessitates a lot of skills I didn't want to spend her points on and changes the character a lot. Rather than shooting for a dualist pilot / medic, my goal is a true generalist who probably won't be left out in any kind of scene, to demonstrate that concept to the noobs. In addition to being a pretty good pilot and medic who can handle herself in a fist fight, she's got a point in each of three different social skills and a +1 Reaction bonus so she can do all the talking if nobody builds a dedicated "face" PC, an array of practical/maintenance skills, and a whopping expensive (for this game) Contact Group that I thought sounded good for information-gathering on a multitude of topics. Those are all elements that I'd like to plausibly keep, if possible; the journalism theme tying them together is easily-stripped-off chrome.

What would you consider the minimum Piloting skill for her to do ski / mountain trips? Would you consider allowing a Technique to buy off the associated penalties instead of raising raw skill?

(Noobs: This is the proper way to interact with your GM. They are by default volunteering copious time to put up with your shit and entertain you; if you fuck with them you are guaranteed being an asshole)
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« Reply #6 on: January 09, 2015, 07:49:14 AM »

I tend to hesitate to give starting characters skills above 13, but based on what little I know about mountain flying (the husband of one of my former bosses owns a charter airline company based in Centennial; a friend used to have to fly into Aspen a couple of times a month), it can get pretty hairy in a hurry, and that can happen completely unexpectedly. It really can be an adventure.

So, I could see how an experienced mountain pilot would have a 14, and how someone with a 13 would probably be fine, most of the time, but would want another 200 hours or so, in the right-hand seat. She might want to run into some scary situations she could learn from, but she'd want help and support from a more experienced pilot, the first two or three times.

Anyway, that's my thinking.

As for the more rounded generalist, I can definitely see your point about wanting to avoid the military. If Molly started out as a bit of a people-person, it would be easy for her to pick up some interpersonal polish from the sort of passengers she sometimes carries. Moreover, if her boss specifically caters to the affluent, then she'll have learned a lot from him or her.

That raises the question of how she learned to fly helicopters. That's a bit of an esoteric skill (and much more difficult than flying small fixed-wing craft), so that's why I thought "military." However, if one of Molly's parents knew, or if she's been a member of the Utah CAP since she was a teenaged cadet, that could explain it. She'd have the contacts to have learned it, in another way.
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« Reply #7 on: January 09, 2015, 04:55:51 PM »

I tend to hesitate to give starting characters skills above 13, but based on what little I know about mountain flying (the husband of one of my former bosses owns a charter airline company based in Centennial; a friend used to have to fly into Aspen a couple of times a month), it can get pretty hairy in a hurry, and that can happen completely unexpectedly. It really can be an adventure.

So, I could see how an experienced mountain pilot would have a 14, and how someone with a 13 would probably be fine, most of the time, but would want another 200 hours or so, in the right-hand seat. She might want to run into some scary situations she could learn from, but she'd want help and support from a more experienced pilot, the first two or three times.

Anyway, that's my thinking.

...sooo... you support the 13 + Technique build..?

As for the more rounded generalist, I can definitely see your point about wanting to avoid the military. If Molly started out as a bit of a people-person, it would be easy for her to pick up some interpersonal polish from the sort of passengers she sometimes carries. Moreover, if her boss specifically caters to the affluent, then she'll have learned a lot from him or her.

On the subject of preserving the massively-useful Contact Group, how about, "Local High Society?" She doesn't have fancy pants of her own, but she is known and liked in that crowd, and can dress to blend in at a cocktail party, providing her access to a diverse array of knowledge and secondary contacts.

That raises the question of how she learned to fly helicopters. That's a bit of an esoteric skill (and much more difficult than flying small fixed-wing craft), so that's why I thought "military." However, if one of Molly's parents knew, or if she's been a member of the Utah CAP since she was a teenaged cadet, that could explain it. She'd have the contacts to have learned it, in another way.

Pay attention, noobs: This is the polite way to roll influence on the GM, by offering plot hooks for lenience: Her Dad taught her. He was a Vietnam War Air Force hero and had a +4 Rep as the greatest private pilot in Utah, especially in winter/mountain conditions, plus an active business dropping rich extreme skiers at unlikely points, until he vanished mysteriously in the wilderness, with no wreckage ever found. Molly doesn't obsess over it, but would probably pursue leads on this topic vigorously in the absence of powerful disincentive.
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« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2015, 06:43:50 PM »


...sooo... you support the 13 + Technique build..?

LOL! Sure.


On the subject of preserving the massively-useful Contact Group, how about, "Local High Society?" She doesn't have fancy pants of her own, but she is known and liked in that crowd, and can dress to blend in at a cocktail party, providing her access to a diverse array of knowledge and secondary contacts.

Keen idea, and I think it provides a good way to achieve the goals you set when you created the character.  Cool



Pay attention, noobs: This is the polite way to roll influence on the GM, by offering plot hooks for lenience: Her Dad taught her. He was a Vietnam War Air Force hero and had a +4 Rep as the greatest private pilot in Utah, especially in winter/mountain conditions, plus an active business dropping rich extreme skiers at unlikely points, until he vanished mysteriously in the wilderness, with no wreckage ever found. Molly doesn't obsess over it, but would probably pursue leads on this topic vigorously in the absence of powerful disincentive.

Boo yah! GMs love player-generated plot-hooks, and this sort of thing is one thing that makes table-top RPGs differ so fundamentally from computer RPGs. The GM may be first among equals, but a Pen-and-Paper RPG campaign really is a collaborative effort.  Wink
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« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2015, 06:23:44 AM »

Name: Molly Chang, Private Pilot / FCSAR Volunteer [125]:

Image: A short Asian-American (or Asian-Australian) woman with an athletic build, in her late-20s. She wears whatever's appropriate, but whatever it is, it looks great on her, from a cocktail dress, to grease-stained coveralls, to blood-stained coveralls.

Culture: TL: 8 [0]; Familiarity: Western [0]; Languages: English (Native / Native) [0];

Attributes: ST 9 [-10]; DX 11 [20]; IQ 12 [40]; HT 13 [30];

Secondaries: BL 16#; Dam 1d-2 / 1d-1; Spd: 6.0 [0]; Mov: 5 [-5]; HP: 9 [0]; FP: 13 [0]; Perception: 12 [0]; Willpower: 12 [0];

Advantages: Contact Group (High Society: 15, 12-, Somewhat Reliable) [20]; Fashion Sense [5]; Signature Gear (Mechanical Tool Kit) [1];

Perks: Attribute Sub (Piloting -> IQ) [1]; Classic Features (Han Chinese) [1];

Disadvantages: Pacifism (Can't Harm Innocents AND Reluctant Killer) [-15]; Slow Riser [-5]; Vow (Protect the Innocent) [-10];

Quirks: Adrenaline Junkie [-1]; Incompetence: Diplomacy [-1]; Mildly Impulsive [-1]; Mildly Overconfident [-1]; Proud [-1];

Skills: Area Knowledge (E) (Utah) IQ+1 [2]-13; Climbing (A) DX-1 [1]-10; Current Events (E) (High Society) IQ [1]-12; Detect Lies (H) Per-2 [1]-10; Driving/TL8 (A) (Automobile) DX-1 [1]-10; Electronics Operation/TL8 (A) (Media) IQ+1 [4]-13, (Medical) IQ-1 [1]-11; Electronics Repair/TL8 (A) (Media) IQ-1 [1]-11, (Medical) IQ-1 [1]-11; Fast Talk (A) IQ-1 [1]-11; First Aid/TL8 IQ+2 [4]-14; Hiking (A) HT-1 [1]-12; Judo (H) DX+1 [8]-12; Mechanic/TL8 (A) (Helicopter) IQ-1 [1]-11; Navigation (A) (Air) IQ-1 [1]-11; Observation (A) Per [2]-12; Photography/TL8 (A) IQ [2]-12; Piloting/TL8 (A) (Helicopter) IQ+1 [4]-13; Pro Skill (A) (First-Responder) IQ-1 [1]-11; Running (A) HT-1 [1]-12; Sex Appeal (A) HT-1 [1]-12; Swimming (E) HT [1]-13; Tracking (A) Per-1 [1]-11;

Notes: On the practical side, this is a straightforward utility character, well-rounded but especially good at making transportation work, operating it, and healing the party, and also with decent social skills. On the RP side she is probably the biggest bleeding-heart idealist in the party at her core, but is also a slightly-arrogant, slightly-reckless smartass on the surface.  

Background: Molly grew up in Utah and never left (though she is no longer a practicing Mormon). She works as a pilot to pay the bills when she's not volunteering for the FCSAR. Her Dad taught her to fly. He was a Vietnam War Air Force hero and had a +4 Rep as the greatest private pilot in Utah, especially in winter/mountain conditions, plus an active business dropping rich extreme skiers at unlikely points, until he vanished mysteriously in the wilderness, with no wreckage ever found. Molly doesn't obsess over it, but would probably pursue leads on this topic vigorously in the absence of powerful disincentive.
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« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2015, 01:14:37 PM »

Nicely done, sir.
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« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2015, 05:13:08 AM »

Nicely done, sir.

Thanks! Here's Sample #3:

Name: "Large" Lance Linkletter, Paint Salesman / FCSAR Volunteer [125]:

Image: A physically massive man in every possible way: tall, broad-shouldered, and overweight. He is impossible to ignore, but other than that, strangely nondescript.

Culture: TL: 8 [0]; Familiarity: Western [0]; Languages: English (Native / Native) [0];

Attributes: ST 19 [90]; DX 10 [0]; IQ 11 [20]; HT 11 [10];

Secondaries: BL 72#; Dam 2d-1 / 3d+1; Spd: 5.0 [-5]; Mov: 5 [0]; HP: 23 [8]; FP: 11 [0]; Perception: 11 [0]; Willpower: 11 [0];

Advantages:
Ally (31-Point Lawyer / Wife, 15-) [3];
Contact Group (Local LDS: 12, 12-, Somewhat Reliable) [10];
Fit [5];
Hard to Subdue x1 [2];
Talent +1 (Artist) [5]

Perks:
Forgettable Face [1];

Disadvantages:
Delusion ("Christian Mythology is Real; Other Signs of the Supernatural are Obviously the Work of the Devil or a Hoax") [-10];
Dependent (31-Point Wife, Beloved, 6-) [-10];
Hidebound [-5];
Pacifism (Can't Harm Innocents AND Reluctant Killer) [-15];

Quirks:
Congenial [-1];
Devout Mormon [-1];
Mildly Stubborn [-1];
Overweight [-1];
Responsive [-1];

Skills:
Area Knowledge (E) (Utah) IQ [1]-11;
Artistry (H) (Painting) IQ-1a [1]-10;
Climbing (A) DX-1 [1]-9;
Detect Lies (H) Per-2 [1]-9;
Diplomacy (H) IQ [4]-11;
Driving/TL8 (A) (Automobile) DX-1 [1]-9;
Guns (E) (Rifle) DX [1]-10;
First Aid/TL8 IQ [1]-11;
Hiking (A) HT-1 [1]-10;
Merchant (A) IQ+1 [4]-12;
Running (A) HT-1 [1]-10;
Swimming (E) HT [1]-11;
Tracking (A) Per-1 [1]-9;  
Wrestling (A) DX [2]-10;

Notes: A utility character of a different sort, with relatively lackluster adventure skills, but the sheer strength to move heavy objects (such as an unconscious person) quickly and take a lot of physical abuse. His size and Forgettable Face interact in a strange manner: He will always be picked out of a crowd as "the big guy," but will never be picked out of a crowd of big guys. His wife is highly-competent and only becomes a Dependent for game purposes if something awful randomly happens to her or somebody kidnaps her to influence Lance.

Background: Lance grew up in SLC, but prefers the small-town life. He and his wife have been trying to have kids unsuccessfully for a while now, and he's somewhat-active in his church. He makes a middle-class living running the only paint store in town, and is secretly a frustrated artistic painter. He feels like something is missing from his life, and tries to fill that void by volunteering with the FCSAR. He is normally very stable and rational, but is probably not going to cope well at all with the full realities of this setting (ie: Everything supernatural except God and the Devil is real), possibly in a very entertaining manner with the right player.
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« Reply #12 on: January 12, 2015, 05:52:05 PM »

Hmm, well this campaign does sound interesting, but it sounds like you've got plenty of people already, and I'm not sure how cooperative our schedules out here would be, so I'm just gonna submit this guy as a sample character that someone else can use or modify to their tastes. 

Ralf, as I've nicknamed him is one of my stock fall-back characters, the Pizza Guy from the bad side of town. Obviously, his primary schtick is being a wheelman, but he's also got a little bit of everything he's picked up here and there.  For this build, I filed off some of his more obnoxious Disads to make him slightly easier to work with, but personality-wise he's pretty much Harvey Bullock- he's got a gruff, obnoxious exterior, while underneath that- well, he's still kind of a dick- but he gets the job done.
In this setting, he's actually 'enjoying' forced retirement, after being an 'innocent bystander' in one too many gangland incidents, he's been placed in Witness Relocation and relocated to Moab (Alice Springs might require a little more hand-waving, but I'm sure AUS has something similar to Witsec), he's getting a lot more excersize than he used to, but is still a bit thick in the middle due to years of inactivity and bad diet, the latter of which he still hasn't completely shaken.  Although he's used to his custom rebuild Crown Vic (bought used from the Police, of course), he's starting to get the hang of the heavy 4WD vehicles commonly used by SAR. 

Retired Pizza Guy (125 points)
Human

ST 10 [0]; DX 12 [40]; IQ 12 [40]; HT 10 [0].
Damage 1d-2/1d; BL 20 lbs.; HP 10 [0]; Will 13 [5]; Per 13 [5]; FP 10 [0].
Basic Speed 5 [-10]; Basic Move 5 [0]; Block 7 (DX); Dodge 9; Parry 9 (DX).
Advantages
   Combat Reflexes [15]; Daredevil 1 [15]; Fit [5]; Wheelman 1* [5].
Disadvantages
   Addiction (Tobacco) (Cheap) (Highly addictive; Legal) [-5]; Code of Honor (Highwayman's) [-5]; Compulsive Carousing (12 or less) [-5]; Gluttony (12 or less) [-5]; Impulsiveness (12 or less) [-10]; Social Stigma (Sleazebag) -1 [-5]; Stubbornness [-5].
   Quirks: -5 in undefined quirks
Skills
   Accounting-10 (IQ-2) [1]; Brawling-12 (DX+0) [1]; Broadsword-11 (DX-1) [1]; Carousing-10 (HT+0) [1]; Cartography/TL8-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Climbing-11 (DX-1) [1]; Computer Operation/TL8-12 (IQ+0) [1]; Cooking-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Current Affairs/TL8 (local region)-12 (IQ+0) [1]; Current Affairs/TL8 (Popular Culture)-12 (IQ+0) [1]; Driving/TL8 (Automobile)-13 (DX+1) [2]; Driving/TL8 (Heavy Wheeled)-12 (DX+0) [1]; Electronics Operation/TL8 (Security)-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Escape-10 (DX-2) [1]; Explosives/TL8 (Demolition)-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Fast-Draw (Pistol)-13 (DX+1) [1]; Fast-Talk-12 (IQ+0) [2]; First Aid/TL8 (Human)-12 (IQ+0) [1]; Gambling-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Guns/TL8 (Pistol)-13 (DX+1) [2]; Guns/TL8 (Rifle)-12 (DX+0) [1]; Guns/TL8 (Shotgun)-13 (DX+1) [2]; Hiking-9 (HT-1) [1]; Holdout-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Intimidation-12 (Will-1) [1]; Knife-12 (DX+0) [1]; Law (Traffic Laws)-10 (IQ-2) [1]; Lockpicking/TL8-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Mechanic/TL8 (Automobile)-13 (IQ+1) [2]; Navigation/TL8 (Land)-12 (IQ+0) [1]; Professional Skill (Defensive Driving)-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Professional Skill (First Responder)-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Running-9 (HT-1) [1]; Scrounging-13 (Per+0) [1]; Search-12 (Per-1) [1]; Shadowing-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Sleight of Hand-10 (DX-2) [1]; Smuggling-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Stealth-11 (DX-1) [1]; Streetwise-12 (IQ+0) [1]; Survival (Mountain)-12 (Per-1) [1]; Swimming-10 (HT+0) [1]; Tactics-11 (IQ-1) [1]; Tracking-12 (Per-1) [1]; Urban Survival-12 (Per-1) [1].

*Wheelman Talent gives +1 to: Driving, Freight Handling, Mechanic, Navigation (Land), Streetwise, and Tactics


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« Reply #13 on: January 12, 2015, 06:15:58 PM »

Hmm, well this campaign does sound interesting, but it sounds like you've got plenty of people already, and I'm not sure how cooperative our schedules out here would be, so I'm just gonna submit this guy as a sample character that someone else can use or modify to their tastes.  

Ralf, as I've nicknamed him is one of my stock fall-back characters, the Pizza Guy from the bad side of town.

(SNIP)


He's definitely a fun guy, and would fit in well as a contact/NPC in the campaign. However, the smoking and general lack of fitness means he wouldn't fit in this particular SAR organization (even leaving aside the the other character traits).  Cheesy

The fact is, the Grand County SAR team (the model for 4CSAR) has the kind of funding they do because they need it. The terrain around Moab is incredibly rugged, and the nicely-groomed trails are not the ones where people get lost.

They get lost in the dry canyons of the remote back-country where vehicles just don't go. That's where this particular SAR team spends most of its time and, honestly, Ralf just couldn't hack the physical requirements.

Now, if you wanted to play someone a little more on the low end of the moral spectrum (but not so much he's a problem), you might consider a character similar to Daryl Dixon, as he was in the first season of The Walking Dead. He's got a troubled background, and some serious character flaws to overcome, but it turns out that he's basically a decent guy.

Ralf is a leeetle too much like Merle Dixon, and although Merle was an affably evil badass (at least, by Season 3), he would NOT work.  Shocked
« Last Edit: January 12, 2015, 06:31:19 PM by tshiggins » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: January 12, 2015, 08:27:17 PM »

[snip] Code of Honor (Highwayman's) [-5]; [snip] Social Stigma (Sleazebag) -1 [-5]; [snip]

Can we get descriptions of what these do, please? :]
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